President’s message, July 7, 2015

I just finished our donation request to Meijer for the Duck Walk. I was astonished as to how much we give to this community through our work, and I didn’t even mention all of it!!

Here’s just a snip-it of what I wrote:Kent-Ottawa-Muskegon

Approximately 3.6% of Kent County residents are deaf or hard of hearing, or 22,381 people. There are 9,506 in Ottawa County and 9,012 in Muskegon County.

 

The statistics identify 19.5% are below the poverty line and 12.9% receive SSI. We, at Quota, raise money to change people’s lives by providing low cost hearing aids, support for internet services for those who cannot afford the link to the outside world, phones or even door bells and for interpreters when they go to the doctor’s office. We take for granted the many services they are restricted to enjoying….television, movies, concerts, etc.

Often they are isolated and depressed due to their disability. We will take this donation to impact their lives, and the lives of those around them, in a variety of ways. The deaf have a unique culture all their own. We need to help them feel part of the whole community with positive encouragement.

Achievements:

  • Purchased a set of hearing aids, retail cost $6,000, for a young lady who suffers from MeniHearingAidInEar2ere’s Disease. Quota Club collected used hearing aids for points towards a new set. The young lady is low income and is so thrilled to hear! The Hear for Good Project is still collecting used hearing aids and can now purchase 7 more hearing aids.
  • Collaborate with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services to support summer camp experiences for 50 children

DHHSLogo

  • Work with Northview’s Total Communication Program toGallaudet Logo support 23 high school students NorthviewLogoto visit Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., the only university for deaf students
  • Provide interpreter services to Spanish speaking mothers of children who attend the Grand Rapids Oral Deaf program; provide support of time and services to the programGROD Logo

 

 

 

  • Work with Grand Rapids Community College to provide GRCC Logoa $500 scholarship to an individual who is pursuing a career in assisting the deaf

 

  • Provide donations to Michigan Rehabilitation Services for working adults to find or continue employment for about 30 individualsDeafPersonAtWork

You should all feel very proud of what we do and the path we’re taking to become an outstanding Club.

I appreciate you and all that you do to make it happen and make a difference.

Martha Herman, President

 

President’s Message for June 25, 2015

Quotarians – YOU are amazing people!  You have embraced our mission, our vision and our new format so well.  We are making extraordinary progress in accomplishing our goals to improve our Club!!  We are moving forward with energy, enthusiasm and strength.

I was emailed a copy of our credits toward the Hear For Good program.  I recently had a meeting with Gillian Borkowski at Hear USA.  Some of you may know her from past years in Quota.  She is an outstanding audiologist who continues to share our quest to help the deaf and hard of hearing. Her clients recycle their old hearing aids with her company.recyclesymbol

She graciously gave us a box filled with used parts, totally a donation of 1,237 points!!  We are now at 1,974 and I couldn’t be more proud of the progress we have made!  FABULOUS!

More good news will be coming.  I’m doing these messages in smaller bites rather than one message a month.

Thank you for your support!

Martha

Why, Do Babies Fly Planes?

This question comes up when we say “we bought Pilot Caps” for deaf infants at 2 local schools.

Pilot Cap

Babies don’t fly planes, but some have cochlear implants, or hearing aids, and the caps help them to stay in place.

PilotCap2

This thank you from a teacher says it all:

Pilot Caps“Dear Quota Club,

Thank you so very much for the donation to receive 10 pilot caps for our deaf babies.  It is so important for the babies to keep their hearing aid(s) in and the pilot caps do wonders to achieve this goal.”

Sincerely,

Jane Swainston

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program at Northview

“Hear”‘s an interesting fact

5

 the number of competing

sounds it takes to

confuse the female ear.

 

Heard Mentality

You’re at a party when someone calls your name from across the room. You look around in confusion, trying to pinpoint the source. For help, try asking the guy next to you. A study in the journal Cortex found that women are less adept than men at zeroing in on discrete sounds in noisy environments. Next time you need to hear above the hubbub, tune in to these tips from Bruce Vircks, Au.D., President of the Academy of Doctors of Audiology:

  • Stand close to a wall – the center of a room is generally the loudest spot.
  • At seated functions, choose a high-back chair to block unwanted sounds from behind.
  • In conversation, try positioning yourself next to the speaker so her voice goes directly to your ear. If that’s not possible, move to a well-lit area. Watching a speaker’s lips can provide clues to what she’s saying, even if the racket persists.
taken from BH&G, December 2011, pg. 190